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Found 7 results

  1. Migrate from DS3617xs to DS3615xs

    I have a question regarding models. Running baremetal: DS3617XS 1.0.2b and 6.1.3 15152 Update1 Before I had ds3615xs installed. I migrated to ds3617xs becouse of my 2X Xeon prosessors. (2 X 2.16 quad) The thing i found out is that synocomunity and others dont support ds3617xs with their packages. I run Docker for some of these packages, but should I, or not, migrate back to ds3615xs with my prosessors in mind? Another thing that occured is that my 12Gb ram, was reduced to 8Gb ram after migrating to ds3617xs. That might be hardware fault, not sure. Thank you.
  2. PCIe Gigabit Nic for DSM 6.1

    Can anyone link me to a PCIe Gigabit NIC that they have confirmed working on Jun's DSM6.1? Ordered an Intel nic on amazon, of course it was too old (used e1000e). Looking to buy one that I know will work. Thanks! Currently using an AR8151 on DSM5.2, but it doesn't seem to be working with Jun's loader.
  3. This is an updated tutorial version from the one I made last year. It will enable you to migrate from DSM 5.2 to DSM 6.1.3 directly without the need to upgrade to DSM 6.0.2 first. If for some reason you want to upgrade to DSM 6.0.2 first or simply you do not want to upgrade to DSM 6.1 but only to DSM 6.0.2 then use the link above. To upgrade from DSM 6.02 to DSM 6.1 read here. As most of you know by now Jun was able to find a way to install DSM 6 on non Synology boxes. Here is the thread that I recommend reading. At least make an effort and read the OP: https://xpenology.com/forum/topic/6253-dsm-6xx-loader/ Below is what you need for the operation. I will assume you are doing all this under Windows 10, 8, 7 or XP. If you are on a MAC computer have a look at this post I made on how to burning the image to a USB drive and then mounting the USB drive for editing the content. The rest of the tutorial still applies. If you are currently using DSM 5.1 or below first update to DSM 5.2. If you are doing a fresh install of DSM 6.1 then carry on with the tutorial and omit references to DSM 5.2. - Win32 Disk Imager to make a bootable USB drive; - A 4GB (or any size really) USB drive (flash drive) to install the loader. Not that this is necessary but use preferably a brand name (Kingston, SanDisk...); - A way to read your USB drive VID/PID. Here is a how-to >>> VID and PID; - A good text editor: Notepad++ I really don't recommend using Windows's Notepad; - DSM 6.1.3 PAT file. The file comes straight from Synology servers. The one I link here if or DS3615sx. If you need DS3617sx or DS916+ then search. - Jun's official v1.02b loader (mirror). This is a hybrid UEFI/BIOS loader so it should work in most machines which are capable or reading GUID partition table (GPT). For older machines that can only read MBR the above loader will simply not boot. If that is your case then use @Genesys's v1.02b loader rebuilt image which is MBR based. Note: Jun's loader supports Intel CPUs. For AMD CPUs Jun has stated that the loader needs some work but it has been reported by many users that it actually works. The C1E function in the bios may need to be deactivated in AMD machines. - Custom extra.lzma ramdisk_v3 (only available for DS3615xs). This ramdisk is optional and should only be used if the default ramdisk included in the loader is not detecting your hardware. I am just providing it for those who are having issues with network detection or unrecognised HDD controllers. This custom ramdisk contains additional modules & firmwares. Credits go to @IG-88 for compiling the modules against the latest DSM 6.1.3 source code. I do not warranty they all work but I think most do. If you chose to use this ramdisk, you will need to replace (or rename, so you can revert) the default extra.lzma ramdisk from Jun's loader with this one. See the 'Modules & Firmware Log' at the end of the tutorial for more information on additional modules included in the custom ramdisk. Custom ramdisk temporarily offline - If you are doing a fresh install make sure your drives are plugged in direct succession starting from the 1st SATA port. Usually the first port is described as SATA0 on motherboards. Check with your MoBo manufacturer for exact nomenclature. - OSFMount to modify the grub.cfg file within the loader's image and if necessary to replace the extra.lzma ramdisk with the custom one. This is not strictly necessary as Jun has made it possible to configure what needs to be modified via the Grub Boot Menu. If you prefer using Jun's Grub Boot Menu configuration technic, simply skip Point 4, read Note 4 instead and pick up at Point 5. PLEASE READ EVERYTHING PRIOR ATTEMPTING ANYTHING Use this loader at your own risk. I wont be held responsible for any loss of data or black smokes that may result in the use of this loader. Please note that this loader has a limited amount of modules (drivers) included. If it is fundamental for you to have a NAS operating as quick as possible I recommend you look at the included drivers very carefully at the bottom of this tutorial before attempting an upgrade. If they are not there you will have to compile your own modules/firmwares. Don't ask me to compile them for you. You have been warned. Here we go: 1 - BACKUP your data and save your configuration prior any attempts to migrate from DMS 5.2 to DSM 6.1. I can't stress this enough. JUST DO IT, as Nike likes to say. Also, print this tutorial if you can. It will make your life easier. 2 - Turn off your NAS and unplug the USB drive you are currently using with DSM 5.2. I recommend you put this USB drive aside in case migration to DSM 6.1 doesn’t go as expected and you need to revert to DSM 5.2. It will just make your life easier. 3 - Now go to your workstation/PC, plug a new USB drive (or the old one if you really don’t have any spare USB drives). Use the link I provided earlier to check your USB drive VID/PID. Write down the info somewhere as we will need it later. 4 - Now launch OSFMount. Select Mount New, then select the image file you downloaded earlier (i.e. .img extension file) to open. Now select partition 0 (the one that is 15 MB). Click Ok. Then at the bottom of the window make sure to un-tick the "Read only drive". Click Ok. The partition should now be mounted in file explorer. At this point you can navigate to the /grub directory and edit the grub.cfg file. If you need to replace the extra.lzma ramdisk with the custom ramdisk provided above then you will also need to mount partition 1 (the one that is 30 MB). Below is what you will see in the grub.cfg file. I am only showing below the portion of the code that is relevant for the purpose of this tutorial [...] set extra_initrd="extra.lzma" set info="info.txt" set vid=0x058f set pid=0x6387 set sn=C7LWN09761 set mac1=0011322CA785 set rootdev=/dev/md0 set netif_num=1 set extra_args_3615='' set common_args_3615='syno_hdd_powerup_seq=0 HddHotplug=0 syno_hw_version=DS3615xs vender_format_version=2 console=ttyS0,115200n8 withefi elevator=elevator quiet' set sata_args='sata_uid=1 sata_pcislot=5 synoboot_satadom=1 DiskIdxMap=0C SataPortMap=1 SasIdxMap=0' set default='0' set timeout='1' set fallback='1' [...] You want to modify the following: Change vid=0x090C to vid=0x[your usb drive vid] Change pid=0x1000 to pid=0x[your usb drive pid] Change sn=C7LWN09761 to sn=generate your sn here with DS3615xs or DS 3617xs model (this will depend on which loader you chose) Change mac1=0011322CA785 to mac1=[your NIC MAC address #1]. You can also add set mac2=[your NIC MAC address #2] and so on until mac4 if you have multiple NICs. However, this is not necessary. Recommended: Change set timeout='1' to set timeout='4' - This will allow you more time to make a selection in the Grub Boot Menu when it appears on screen. Once you are done editing the grub.cfg file, save it and close your text editor. Now in OSFMount click on Dismount all & Exit. You are now ready to burn the image to your USB drive. 5 - Now use Win32 Disk Imager to burn the image file onto the USB drive. This will also make the USB drive bootable. 6 - Eject and unplug the USB drive from your workstation. Plug it in your NAS (avoid USB 3.0 ports. Use USB 2.0 port if available). Boot your NAS and before doing anything fancy, access your BIOS so to make your USB drive the 1st boot drive if it's not the case. The Jun official loader can boot in UEFI or in legacy BIOS, so you chose what suits you best. Also, make sure your HDDs are booting in AHCI mode and not in IDE. Finally, if disabled, also enable the serial port in BIOS. Some BIOS don't have this option so don't get too cranky on this if you can't find it. Save changes to the BIOS and REBOOT the NAS. 7 - Once rebooted, if you have a monitor connected to your NAS you will see the following Grub Boot Menu: ADVICE: even before you see the Grub Boot Menu press the up/down key. This will stop the countdown so you will be able to select the desired line. You won’t see much other than the following after you press enter: If you booted the USB drive in EFI mode then you will see the same text without the last 3 lines but that's ok. 8 - Now go back to your workstation, and launch Synology Assitant or go to http://find.synology.com. Within one minute or so you should normally be able to see your NAS on your local network (it took ~55 seconds on a test I did on a VM). Just follow the instructions and either chose "Install" if you wish to have a clean install or chose “Migration” if you are coming from DMS 5.2 and wish to update while retaining your data. You will be asked to provide the .PAT file you downloaded earlier (DSM_DS3615xs_15152.pat). 9 - When the migration is finished you will most probably have to update some of your packages. You can then proceed and update DSM 6.1.3 up to DSM 6.1.3-15152 update 3. It is possible you might either need to hard reboot or re-image your usb drive. Make sure to deactivate auto-updates within DSM. Link to individual files (DSM and critical updates) can be found here: https://xpenology.com/forum/topic/7294-links-to-dsm-and-critical-updates/ 10 - You are done. If you have questions, first search the forum and/or Google then leave a comment if nothing helps. Please provide your hardware specifications (motherboard model, LAN controller, driver controller etc). Failure to prove such information will lead to the post being deleted. Click the 'Like this' button if you liked the tutorial. -------------- Note 1: If after following the tutorial you can’t find your NAS through http://find.synology.com ou Synology Assistant it is highly possible that the drivers of your NIC are not included in the ramdisk of the loader. Make an effort and use Google to know what modules your NIC and HDD controller are using, then check if those modules are included in the custom extra.lzma ramdisk. If yes then use the custom ramdisk. Don't ask me to look for you. If nothing works then ask your question. Note 2: Synology increased security since the introduction of DSM 6. Root access through SSH is no longer possible out of the box. You can however use your admin account and elevate permissions with the following command if you need root permissions: sudo -i Note 3: Please check you have the right VID/PID prior proceeding. If you get the following error ”Failed to install the file. The file is probably corrupted. (13)" it most certainly means your VID and/or PID is/are wrong. If you still have the same error message after verifying the VID/PID then try another USB drive. Note 4: Configuration added to the grub.cfg file can also be done directly during the Grub Boot Menu, so technically you can skip Point 4 and burn the image on the USB drive without editing anything (read Point 5 onward first). If you wish to do the changes from the Grub Boot Menu directly you need to press the letter 'C' when you see the Boot Menu. You will literally only have one second, so be fast. Once you press 'C' you will be in a Grub command line environment. To change your VID enter the following: vid 0xYOUR 4 DIGITS USB DRIVE VID Do the same for pid, sn and mac1. Press enter at each command. The commands are: pid 0xYOUR 4 DIGITS USB DRIVE PID sn YOUR NAS SERIAL NUMBER mac1 YOUR NAS MAC1 ADDRESS If you have multiple NICs you can also issue mac2, mac3 and mac4 as commands. Maximum is mac4. See below: mac2 YOUR NAS MAC2 ADDRESS mac3 YOUR NAS MAC3 ADDRESS mac4 YOUR NAS MAC4 ADDRESS If you think you made a mistake in the numbers simply re-issue the command. When you are done press esc and select the appropriate menu entry. Below is an example (fake numbers) of how it looks under the Grub command line environment : Note 5: If you encounter the error "We've detected errors on your hard drives [drive number] and the SATA ports have also been disabled" during installation, then you have to fallback to adding SataPortMap to the grub environment. Press the letter 'C' at the Grub Boot Menu and then add the following: append SataPortMap=XX where XX is the number of drives. Don’t forget to update this parameter if you add additional drives to your machine. If you use Reinstall, don't forget to re-select the first line of the Boot Menu once the NAS has rebooted after the installation else the Loader will re-select Reinstall and you will be faced with some issues so please beware of this. @@@@@@@@ What does SataPortMap mean? @@@@@@@ @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ ############## Know issues ##################### - When running on a slow single core machine, there is a race condition that causes the patcher to load too late. The most obvious sign is that console is not working properly. - Some ethernet drivers crash when set MTU above about 4096 (Jumbo frame). ############# Included default modules & firmwares in Jun's Loader ############# Modules & Firmwares Log - Click HERE Modules alx.ko ata_piix.ko atl1.ko atl1c.ko atl1e.ko ax88179_178a.ko bnx2.ko bnx2x.ko BusLogic.ko button.ko cnic.ko e1000.ko ipg.ko jme.ko libcrc32c.ko libphy.ko mdio.ko megaraid_mbox.ko megaraid_mm.ko megaraid_sas.ko megaraid.ko mii.ko mpt3sas.ko mptbase.ko mptctl.ko mptsas.ko mptscsih.ko mptspi.ko netxen_nic.ko ohci-hcd.ko pch_gbe.ko pcnet32.ko ptp_pch.ko qla3xxx.ko qlcnic.ko qlge.ko r8168.ko r8169.ko scsi_transport_spi.ko sfc.ko skge.ko sky2.ko tg3.ko uio.ko usbnet.ko vmw_pvscsi.ko vmxnet3.ko Firmwares bnx2/bnx2-rv2p-06-6.0.15.fw bnx2/bnx2-rv2p-09-6.0.17.fw bnx2/bnx2-rv2p-09ax-6.0.17.fw tigon/tg3_tso.bin tigon/tg3_tso5.bin tigon/tg3.bin Hide ############# Additional modules & firmwares in the custom extra.lzma ramdisk made by IG-88 ############# Modules & Firmwares Log - Click HERE Modules 3w-9xxx.ko 3w-sas.ko aacraid.ko aic94xx.ko arcmsr.ko asix.ko alt2.ko cx82310_eth.ko e100.ko evdev.ko forcedeth.ko hpsa.ko hptiop.ko igbvf.ko isci.ko ixgb.ko ixgbevf.ko mvmdio.ko mvsas.ko mvumi.ko plusb.ko r8152.ko rtl8150.ko sx8.ko Firmwares bnx2/bnx2-mips-06-6.2.3.fw bnx2/bnx2-mips-09-6.2.1b.fw e100/d101m_ucode.bin e100/d101s_ucode.bin e100/d102e_ucode.bin tigon/tg357766.bin Hide ############## Tutorial UPDATES ################## Change log - Click HERE [12/09/2017] Tutorial creation [15/09/2017] "[...] Please provide your hardware specifications (motherboard model, LAN controller, driver controller etc). Failure to prove such information will lead to the post being deleted. Click the 'Like this' button if you liked the tutorial." [17/09/2017] Temporary removal of IG-88 custom ramddisk due to some modules creating issues. [18/09/2017] Changed S/N generator link with updated version (https://xpenogen.github.io/serial_generator/index.html) [27/09/2017] Added link to upgrade procedure from DSM 6.0.2 to DSM 6.1 in top paragraph [22/10/2017] Update jun's loader link to https://mega.nz/#F!BtFQ2DgC!JgomNP3X8V9EuwxL4TXbng!EscjTCAB and mirror link to https://mega.nz/#F!yQpw0YTI!DQqIzUCG2RbBtQ6YieScWg!iJZjAJoa - Directly to v1.02b Hide
  4. If you have a dynamic IP, you will need to setup a DDNS to access your NAS from outside your local network. So to start thing off you will need to open an account with a DDNS service provider. There are plenty out there, some paid, some free. The two below are the ones that I use personally. They are free. If you find others then you should also be able to use those. Some of these providers might already be part of the list included by Synology in which case you can skip the 'Customize' button and simply use the 'Add' button and select your service provider from there. The configuration example I am giving below will be based on duckdns.org because it's the easiest I have seen out there but unfortunately it is not included in the DDNS service providers list included by Synology so you will need to use the 'Customize' button first. - http://www.duckdns.org - http://www.nsupdate.info Once you have chosen your domain with duckdns.org you will need to configure DSM accordingly. So here is how to: In Control Panel go to External Access (1), then click on Customize (2). A new window should open. You need to fill in as per the image. To save you some time you can copy paste from the code tag provided below the image: http://www.duckdns.org/update?domains=__HOSTNAME__&token=__PASSWORD__&ip=__MYIP__ When you are done click Save. The window should close. Now click on Add (3), see first image. A new window should open. Select *DuckDns from the service provider list and fill in your duckdns domain, username and token: Click on Test Connection to verify that it's working. If it is working you should see the word Normal in green next to Status. You can then click Ok. If it is not working then it means you screwed up somewhere. Recheck query URL, domain, username and token. All that is left to do is to configure port forwarding on your router. This is called at times "port forwarding" or "port mapping". You need to check with your router's user guide as sometimes the wording differs from one brand to the other. The port(s) you will be forwarding to your box also need to be opened on DSM's firewall else DSM will refuse access to the port/service requested. If your ISP implements double NAT you might have to do some additional configuration to your router to allow the ports to be forwarded correctly. Check with your ISP first and also check this site or this site on how to overcome double NAT. Google is your friend. Note of caution here: If you want to make things very safe you would only port forward VPN ports. This means that you can only access your box via VPN which in turn then gives you full access to the box (and to your local network if configured accordingly) once a VPN connection is established. You could also port forward the GUI ports (usually 5000/5001 or the ones you would have customised). This would give you full GUI access to DSM from outside of your network but this can be unsafe specially if you don't have a strong password and proper firewall and safety mechanisms configured in DSM. You could also just forward the port(s)/service(s) that you need. It really all depends what you are using your box for but in most cases the VPN solution is the safest although not the most convenient. NEVER EVER port forward port 22 unless you know exactly what you are doing. To test that your box is accessible from the outside world while being at home you could use your smart phone in data mode (not in wifi) at the following address: http://[yourdomain].duckdns.org:[port number] or https://[yourdomain].duckdns.org:[port number] - Do no put www
  5. After fiddling with it for a day, and getting it to work, I thought it would be nice to share the knowledge, especially since "officially" only ESXi is supported, and ESXi is picky about supporting stuff... The main reason for me to move to a hypervisor was because Synology has not yet introduced NVMe support AT ALL. And even with a kernel driver, the Storage Manager will not see it as an SSD, as an HDD, or anything. Synology is silent about this, even though some have requested it on their forums (although they do not have a model with M.2 NVMe connector yet, they have some models with full sized x16 or x4 PCIe ports, which can be used with an adapter card for NVMe). So I decided to try with a hypervisor. On one hand it makes installation easier, upgrading also, and I don't need a display connected (since most hypervisors provide a VNC connection to the guest OS). On the other hand, I can install the measly 2-3GB hypervisor and all the tools on the NVMe SSD, and have the rest mounted as a VMDK (or any other virtual disk file). The rest of the hard drives would use passthrough of course. I fiddled around with multiple options. XenServer simply refused to boot in UEFI mode, ESXi does not support my network adapter, or my built-in SATA controller (B250 chipset), Microsoft's Hyper-V server has issues if you do not have a domain server on the network, also as soon as the display output goes off, the device drops network connection. It left me with Proxmox. Never used it, and during installation I had some issues with the bootloader (both on 4.4 release and 5.0 beta). Luckily there's a workaround, since it is based on Debian, one can use the Debian netinst image, create a very basic system, and install Proxmox on top. I won't bore you with the details, there are enough guides about installing it to make me think twice before I write an (n+1)th version. So let's begin! Requirements: A working install of Proxmox 5.0 - it can be 4.4 too, but I only tested this on 5.0. Follow the guide to create the bridged network interface! The loader you wish to use. I recommend Jun's Loader, specifically 1.02a2 at the time of the writing of this guide. Steps: 0. Edit the loader (if needed) to your liking - MAC address, serial number, etc. This is especially important if you have multiple XPE systems on the same network. 1. Create a new VM in Proxmox. 1.1 Set the name, and make sure to note down the VM ID (if it is your first VM, it should be 100). I'll be using {VM_ID} as a placeholder from now on. 1.2 OS type should be "Linux 4.x/3.x/2.6 Kernel". 1.3 Set the CD/DVD to "Do not use media" (we will remove the virtual disk drive any way later on). 1.4 For the HDD, you should create a new virtual disk with the format of your liking (qcow2, vmdk or raw), this will be the initial drive. I made sure that it uses nearly the whole storage of the OS drive it was installed on (in my case it was a 256GB NVMe SSD, which, after setup and partitioning, resulted in a 226GiB root drive, of which I had 211GB free, so I set the virtual disk's size to 200GB). You can set it to any kind of bus, EXCEPT VirtIO. With VirtIO I had performance issues, so I went with SCSI (it supports up to 12 devices any way, so it is better). This is for the virtual disk only, VirtIO works just fine with passthrough devices. So apart from the bus, size and format, you don't need to touch a thing. 1.5 For CPU, set kvm64 with as many cores as your host has (incl. virtual cores if you're on a HyperThreading supported CPU!). In my case with the Intel G4560 this is 4. 1.6 For RAM, you should leave some slack for the host OS, I went with 7.5GB from the 8GB I have. Ballooning is not required. 1.7 Networking. This is where many things can go wrong. The VirtIO paravirtualized network adapter should work, but to be safe I went with the Intel E1000. On the left select Bridged Mode, with the previously created bridge as the first choice. You can also enable Firewall if you do not trust Syno's own. Leave the rest of the settings as default. 1.8 On the Confirm page, confirm your settings and create the VM. 2. After the VM is created, first thing to do is to remove the virtual disk drive (IDE 2, if everything went right). Then comes the hard part. 3. You have to add each and every HDD to the config file that you want to use for passthrough. The command is simple: qm set {VM_ID} -[protocol][port] /dev/disk/by-id/[disk-id] The {VM_ID} part is obvious, but what about the rest? [protocol] is the connection protocol you want to use. This can be sata, ide, scsi or virtio. I'm using SATA here, but you can use anything (IDE is not IDEal for us). SATA supports up to 6 devices (port indexes 0-6), scsi supports up to 12 devices, and virtio does not have a limitation to my knowledge. [port] is the first unused port of said protocol. E.g. if you set the initial disk during setup to SATA0, and you want to use SATA further here, you have to start numbering from 1. [disk-id] is the unique identifier of your HDD. Go to /dev/disk/by-id/ and list the disks you see. For most SATA devices, you'll see entries like "ata-[MANUFACTURER]_[MODEL]_[sERIAL]". So let's say I have 4 disks, with the disk-id's ata-1, ata-2, ata-3, and ata-4 (yours will be a lot longer, but don't worry, you can use the bash autocomplete with the tab key). For this to work I execute the following commands: qm set 100 -sata1 /dev/disk/by-id/ata-1 qm set 100 -sata2 /dev/disk/by-id/ata-2 qm set 100 -sata3 /dev/disk/by-id/ata-3 qm set 100 -sata4 /dev/disk/by-id/ata-4 Of course later on you can add further HDDs to a VM config by using the same command, just keep in mind the limitations of the protocols. 4. Now comes the hard part, we'll have to add the bootloader image file to the config. The config file is located under /etc/pve/qemu-server/, and is named {VM_ID}.conf. Open it with nano. This config file defines everything about the VM. Disks to mount, which device to use for booting, RAM amount, CPU cores, name of the VM, et cetera. Don't touch anything else than the lines you see here! Copy the synoboot.img to somewhere on your server. If you want to be consistent with the Proxmox setup, copy it under /var/lib/vz/images/{VM_ID}/ - you'll need root for that. After that, come back to the conf file, and open it again. You'll enter a few things here, make sure you pay attention! Enter the following line into the conf file, and make sure you replace the parts in the path! args: -device 'piix3-usb-uhci,addr=0x18' -drive 'id=synoboot,file=/var/lib/vz/images/{VM_ID}/synoboot.img,if=none,format=raw' -device 'usb-storage,id=synoboot,drive=synoboot' Make sure to replace the path to the synoboot.img with your own! One more thing to edit here, the boot device. Find the line that begins with "boot: " and replace it so it looks like this: boot: synoboot Save the file, then start the VM. It should start up without an issue, and you'll be able to use find.synology.com to find your server and install it.
  6. If you can't access your Xpenology box but you still wish to try and 'fix' some configuration files or perhaps you wish to finally make that backup that you should have done before fiddling with the root user, then you can access the content of the system partition and data partitions through a Live Ubuntu CD (or whatever unix flavoured OS you so desire). Here is how to: 1 - Make a Live Ubuntu USB drive. Ideally it is more convenient to make a persistent Live Ubuntu USB drive but that's not required for this tutorial and it would just complicate things unnecessarily. 2 - Once you're done burning Ubuntu on the USB flash drive, go plug it in your Xpenology box and boot from it. 3 - Once in Ubuntu, launch Terminal. You will need to first be root so type: sudo -i 4 - Now install mdadm and lvm2 by typing the following command: apt-get install mdadm lvm2 You should get the following Postfix Configuration menu: Select as shown in the pictures above. If you wish to mount the data partition alone then proceed with the following command: 5 - To mount the data partition, simply issue this command and you are done: mdadm -Asf && vgchange -ay If you also wish to mount the system partition then proceed with the following commands (adapt to your case accordingly): 6 - Then you need to check your raid array and partitioning of your drives: fdisk -l | grep /dev/sd In my case I see this. Note I only have 2 drives /dev/sda and /dev/sdb [spoiler=] root@server:/etc.defaults# fdisk -l | grep /dev/sd Disk /dev/sda: 1.8 TiB, 2000398934016 bytes, 3907029168 sectors /dev/sda1 256 4980735 4980480 2.4G fd Linux raid autodetect /dev/sda2 4980736 9175039 4194304 2G fd Linux raid autodetect /dev/sda3 9437184 3907015007 3897577824 1.8T f W95 Ext'd (LBA) /dev/sda5 9453280 3907015007 3897561728 1.8T fd Linux raid autodetect Disk /dev/sdb: 1.8 TiB, 2000398934016 bytes, 3907029168 sectors /dev/sdb1 256 4980735 4980480 2.4G fd Linux raid autodetect /dev/sdb2 4980736 9175039 4194304 2G fd Linux raid autodetect /dev/sdb3 9437184 3907015007 3897577824 1.8T f W95 Ext'd (LBA) /dev/sdb5 9453280 3907015007 3897561728 1.8T fd Linux raid autodetect System partitions are the ones labeled sda1, sdb1. If you have more drives in the array, subsequent system partitions will probably be called sdc1, sdd1 so on and so forth. You get the point. 7 - Once you figured out all system partitions, you can examine the foreign endian array members by issuing (this is for my case, with 2 drives): mdadm -Ee0.swap /dev/sda1 /dev/sdb1 If you have 3 drives then you add /dev/sdc1. You get the idea. 8 - Finally, assemble the array and fix the byte order (this is for my case, with 2 drives): mdadm -AU byteorder /dev/md0 /dev/sda1 /dev/sdb1 Same comment as previous command; add any additional system partitions that you may have. Beware of the /dev/md0. It's normal, not a mistake. Your system partition should now be mounted and you can navigate through the system files. Simply unmount the drives and shutdown the machine when you are done. If for some reason you need to reboot and want to access the partitions again then you will need to re-install mdadm and lvm2 because the Live Ubuntu USB is not persistent. --------- Reference: https://www.synology.com/en-global/knowledgebase/DSM/tutorial/Storage/How_can_I_recover_data_from_my_DiskStation_using_a_PC http://xpenology.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=22100&p=83631&hilit=version#p83631 http://xpenology.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=20216&p=74659&hilit=mdadm#p74659 >> Thanks to Jun
  7. I created a tutorial for the French section so I thought, what the heck, let's do it for the English one as well. Here it goes. As most of you know by now Jun was able to find a way to install DSM 6 on non Synology boxes. Here is the thread that I recommend reading. At least make an effort and read the OP: https://xpenology.com/forum/topic/6253-dsm-6xx-loader/ Below is what you need for the operation. I will assume you are doing all this under Windows 10, 8, 7 or XP. If you are on a MAC computer have a look at this post I made on how to burning the image to a USB drive and then mounting the USB drive for editing the content. The rest of the tutorial still applies. If you are currently using DSM 5.1 or below first update to DSM 5.2. If you are doing a fresh install of DSM 6.0 then carry on with the tutorial and omit references to DSM 5.2. - Win32 Disk Imager to make a bootable USB drive; - A 4GB (or any size really) USB drive (flash drive) to install the loader. Not that this is necessary but use preferably a brand name (Kingston, SanDisk...); - A way to read your USB drive VID/PID. Here is a how-to >>> VID and PID; - A good text editor: Notepad++ I really don't recommend using Windows's Notepad; - DSM 6.0.2. The file comes straight from Synology servers; - Jun's official v1.01 loader (mirror). This is a hybrid UEFI/BIOS loader so it should work in most machines. Loader supports Intel and AMD CPUs; - Customized extra.lzma ramdisk. This ramdisk is optional and should only be used if the default ramdisk included in the loader is not detecting your hardware. I am just providing it for those who are having issues with network detection or unrecognised HDD controllers. This custom ramdisk contains additional modules (drivers) that were mostly taken from Quicknick's loader. I don't warranty they all work but I think most do. If you chose to use this ramdisk, you will need to replace (or rename, so you can revert) the default extra.lzma ramdisk from Jun's loader with this one. See change log at the end of the tutorial for additional modules. - Make sure your drives are plugged in direct succession starting from the 1st SATA port. Usually the first port is described as SATA0 on motherboards. Check with your MB manufacturer for exact nomenclature. - OSFMount to modify the grub.cfg file within the loader's image. This is not strictly necessary as Jun has made it possible to configure what needs to be modified via the Grub Boot Menu. I recommend you use OSFMount for now although it adds an extra step. If you prefer using Jun's new feature simply skip Point 5, read Note 4 instead and pick up at Point 6. PLEASE READ EVERYTHING PRIOR ATTEMPTING ANYTHING Use this loader at your own risk. I wont be held responsible for any loss of data or black smokes that may result in the use of this loader. Please note that this loader is based on DSM 6.0 Beta 2 branch 7274 and that a limited amount of drivers are included in the loader. If it is fundamental for you to have a NAS operating as quick as possible I recommend you look at the included drivers first at the bottom of this tutorial. If they are not there you will have to compile your own drivers. One last thing: DO NOT UPDATE DSM BEYOND VERSION 6.0.2 (6.0.3, 6.1, 6.1.1, 6.1.2, 6.1.3 etc) with loader v1.01. You have been warned. Here we go: 1 - BACKUP your data and save your configuration prior any attempts to migrate from DMS 5.2 to DSM 6.0.2. I can't stress this enough. JUST DO IT, as Nike likes to say. Also, print this tutorial if you can. It will make your life easier. 2 - Turn off your NAS and unplug the USB drive you are currently using with DSM 5.2. I recommend you put this USB drive aside in case migration to DSM 6.0.2 doesn’t go as expected and you need to revert to DSM 5.2. It will just make your life easier. 3 - Now go to your workstation/PC, plug a new USB drive (or the old one if you really don’t have any spare USB drives). Use the link I provided earlier to check your USB drive VID/PID. Write down the info somewhere as we will need it later. 4 - Unzip the loader you downloaded earlier. You will end up with a folder containing several files. Since we are installing on bare-metal you will only need the image file "synoboot.img". 5 - Now launch OSFMount. Select Mount New, then select the image file (i.e. synoboot.img) to open. Now select partition 0 (the one that is 30 MB). Click Ok. Then at the bottom of the window make sure to un-tick the "Read only drive". Click Ok. The EFI partition of the image file should now be mounted in file explorer. At this point you can navigate to the /image/DS3615xs directory and replace the extra.lzma ramdisk with the one provided above. When you are done come back to the root directory and go to the /grub directory and edit the grub.cfg file. Below is what you will see in the file. I am only showing below the portion of the code that is relevant for the purpose of this tutorial [...] set extra_initrd="extra.lzma" set info="info.txt" set vid=0x058f set pid=0x6387 set sn=C7LWN09761 set mac1=0011322CA785 set rootdev=/dev/md0 set netif_num=1 set extra_args_3615='' set common_args_3615='syno_hdd_powerup_seq=0 HddHotplug=0 syno_hw_version=DS3615xs vender_format_version=2 console=ttyS0,115200n8 withefi elevator=elevator quiet' set sata_args='sata_uid=1 sata_pcislot=5 synoboot_satadom=1 DiskIdxMap=0C SataPortMap=1 SasIdxMap=0' set default='0' set timeout='1' set fallback='1' [...] You want to modify the following: Change vid=0x090C to vid=0x[your usb drive vid] Change pid=0x1000 to pid=0x[your usb drive pid] Change sn=C7LWN09761 to sn=generate your sn here with DS3615xs model Change mac1=0011322CA785 to mac1=[your NIC MAC address]. You can also add set mac2=[your NIC MAC address #2] and so on until mac4 if you have multiple NICs. However, this is not necessary. Optional: Change set timeout='1' to set timeout='4' - This will allow you more time to make a selection in the Grub Boot Menu when it appears. Once you are done editing the grub.cfg file, save it and close your text editor. Now in OSFMount click on Dismount all & Exit. You are now ready to burn the image to your USB drive. 6 - Now use Win32 Disk Imager to burn the image file onto the USB drive. This will also make the USB drive bootable. 7 - Eject and unplug the USB drive from your workstation. Plug it in your NAS (avoid USB 3.0 ports. Use USB 2.0 port if available). Boot your NAS and before doing anything fancy, access your BIOS so to make your USB drive the 1st boot drive if it's not the case. The loader can boot in UEFI or in legacy BIOS, so you chose what suits you best. Also, make sure your HDDs are booting in AHCI mode and not in IDE, else it wont work. Finally, if disabled, also enable the serial port in BIOS. Some BIOS don't have this option so don't get too cranky on this if you can't find it. Save changes to the BIOS and REBOOT the NAS. 8 - Once rebooted, if you have a monitor connected to your NAS you will see the following Grub Boot Menu: If you are on an Intel based machine you can simply let it be and the loader will automatically start. However, if you are on a AMD based machine you will need to select the 4th line and then press enter. ADVICE: even before you see the Grub Boot Menu press the up/down key. This will stop the countdown so you will be able to select the desired line. You won’t see much other than the following after you press enter: If you booted the USB drive in EFI mode then you will see the same text without the last 3 lines but that's ok. 9 - Now go back to your workstation, and launch Synology Assitant or go to http://find.synology.com. Within one minute or so you should normally be able to see your NAS on the local network (it took 55 seconds on a test I did on a VM). Just follow the instructions and either chose "Install" if you wish to have a clean install or chose “Migration” if you are coming from DMS 5.2 and wish to update while retaining your data. You will be asked to provide the .PAT file you downloaded earlier (DSM_DS3615xs_8451.pat). 10 - When the migration is finished you will most probably have to update some of your packages. You can then proceed and update DSM 6.0 up to DSM 6.0.2-8451 update 11. It is possible you might either need to hard reboot or re-image your usb drive. DO NOT UPDATE DSM TO VERSIONS 6.0.3, 6.1, 6.1.1 or 6.1.2 with loader v1.01. Make sure to deactivate auto-updates within DSM. 11 - You are done. If you have questions, first search the forum and/or Google then leave a comment if nothing helps. Please provide your hardware specifications (motherboard model, LAN controller, driver controller etc). Failure to prove such information will lead to the post being deleted. Click the 'Like this' button if you liked the tutorial. -------------- Note 1: If after following the tutorial you can’t find your NAS through http://find.synology.com ou Synology Assistant it is highly possible that the drivers of your NIC are not included in the ramdisk of the loader. Make an effort and use Google to know what modules your NIC and HDD controller are using, then check if those modules are included in the custom extra.lzma ramdisk. If yes then use the custom ramdisk. Don't ask me to look for you. If nothing works then ask your question. Note 2: Synology increased security in DSM 6. Root access through SSH is no longer available out of the box. You can however use your admin account and elevate permissions with the following command sudo -i Note 3: Please check you have the right VID/PID prior proceeding. If you get the following error ”Failed to install the file. The file is probably corrupted. (13)" it means your VID and/or PID is wrong. If you are 200% sure that your VID/PID is correct and you still get that error message then try to 'Force Install'. If that doesn't work then try another USB drive. Note 4: Changes made to the grub.cfg file can also be done directly during the Grub Boot Menu, so technically you can skip Point 5 and burn the image on the USB drive without editing anything (read Point 6 onward first). If you wish to do the changes from the Grub Boot Menu directly you need to press the letter 'C' when you see the Boot Menu. You will literally only have one second, so be fast. Once you press C you will be in a Grub command line environment. To change your VID enter the following: vid 0xYOUR 4 DIGITS USB DRIVE VID Do the same for pid, sn and mac1. Press enter at each command. The commands are: pid 0xYOUR 4 DIGITS USB DRIVE PID sn YOUR NAS SERIAL NUMBER mac1 YOUR NAS MAC1 ADDRESS If you have multiple NICs you can also issue mac2, mac3 and mac4 as commands. Maximum is mac4. See below: mac2 YOUR NAS MAC2 ADDRESS mac3 YOUR NAS MAC3 ADDRESS mac4 YOUR NAS MAC4 ADDRESS If you think you made a mistake in the numbers simply re-issue the command. When you are done press esc and select the appropriate menu entry. Below is an example of how it looks under the Grub command line environment: Note 5: If your encounter the error "We've detected errors on your hard drives [drive number] and the SATA ports have also been disabled" during installation, try the Force Install menu entry in the Grub Boot Menu. If this does not work then you have to fallback to adding SataPortMap to the grub environment. Press the letter 'C' at the Grub Boot Menu and then add the following: append SataPortMap=XX where XX is the number of drives. Don’t forget to update this parameter if you add additional drives to your machine. If you use Force Install, don't forget to re-select the first line of the Boot Menu once the NAS has rebooted after the installation else the Loader will re-select Force Install and you will be faced with some issues so please beware of this. @@@@@@@@ What does SataPortMap mean? @@@@@@@ @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ ############## Know issues ##################### - When running on a slow single core machine, there is a race condition that causes the patcher to load too late. The most obvious sign is that console is not working properly. - Some ethernet drivers crash when set MTU above about 4096 (Jumbo frame). ############# Included default modules in Jun's Loader ############# Change log - Trantor » 23 Oct 2016 20:50 - Click HERE Original Post Updated broadcom tg3, bnx2, bnx2x, cnic Updated intel e1000e (I219 support) Add/Updated realtek r8168, r8169 and r8101 (r8169 from realtek website no the one inside the kernel tree) Hide Change log - Arcao » 25 Oct 2016 20:22 - Click HERE Original Post Added below kernel modules: r8101: RTL8100E/RTL8101E/RTL8102E-GR/RTL8103E(L) RTL8102E(L)/RTL8101E/RTL8103T RTL8401/RTL8401P/RTL8105E RTL8402/RTL8106E/RTL8106EUS r8168: RTL8111B/RTL8168B/RTL8111/RTL8168 RTL8111C/RTL8111CP/RTL8111D(L) RTL8168C/RTL8111DP/RTL8111E r8168: RTL8168E/RTL8111F/RTL8411 RTL8111G/RTL8111GUS/RTL8411B(N) RTL8118AS * Note: r8169 from Trantor archive doesn't work with my on-board Realtek RTL8111GR. So I kept the existing which is also much bigger. e1000e: 82573L/82572EI/82571EB/82573E/82573V/82567/82574L/82566MM/82566MC e1000e: 82566DM/82566DC/82563EB/82574IT/82583V/82579LM/82579V/82577LC/82577LM e1000e: 82578DC/82578DM/Gigabit CT Desktop Adapter/PRO/1000 PT/PF/I217-LM/V/I218-V/LM/I219 LM/V bnx2: Broadcom NetXtremeII BCM5706/BCM5708/5709/5716 bnx2x: Broadcom NetXtremeII 10Gb BCM57710/BCM57711/BCM57711E/BCM57712 tg3: Broadcom Tigon3 BCM5705/BCM5703/BCM5702/BCM5701/BCM5700/BCM5721/BCM5751/BCM5788/BCM5704/BCM5752/BCM5789 tg3 : BCM5723/BCM5761/BCM5787/BCM5755/BCM5722/BCM5754/BCM57781/BCM57785/BCM5718BCM57765/BCM57761 tg3: BCM5719/BCM5725/BCM5762/BCM5720/BCM57790/BCM57795/BCM57766/BCM57780 * Note: Existing modules updated with version from Trantor archive. I also added missing firmware files. ax88179_178a : ASIX AX88179/178A USB 3.0/2.0 to Gigabit Ethernet mpt2sas: LSI SAS 6Gb/s Host Adapters SAS2004, SAS2008, SAS2108, SAS2116, SAS2208, SAS2308 and SSS6200 * Note: It's already included in existing ramdisk but not loaded. By dmesg it's started correctly. evdev, button: for acpid Hide Change log - Arcao » 28 Oct 2016 10:47 - Click HERE Original Post * Fixed loading modules after installation step and upgrading from previous ramdisk version * Fixed order of loading kernel modules (cause not loading cnic) -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Recompiled kernel modules: r8169: r8169-6.022.00 sources * Note: Compiled by Trantor igb: igb-5.3.5.4 sources ixgbe: ixgbe-4.4.6 sources * Note: Compiled from latest sources at intel.com megaraid_sas: megaraid_sas-06.812.07.00 sources mpt2sas: mpt2sas-20.00.04.00 sources * Note: Compiled from latest sources at lsi.com/avagotech.com -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Added kernel modules: mpt3sas: mpt3sas-14.00.00.00 sources * Note: Compiled from latest sources at lsi.com/avagotech.com ftdi_sio, cp210x, ch341, pl2303 * Note: ftdi_sio is compiled by Synology, others are compiled from 7274 kernel sources Hide ############# Additional modules in the custom extra.lzma ramdisk ############# Change log - Click HERE 3c59x.ko 3w-9xxx.ko 3w-sas.ko 3w-xxxx.ko 8021q.ko 8139cp.ko 8139too.ko a100u2w.ko aacraid.ko advansys.ko ahci_platform.ko aic79xx.ko aic7xxx.ko aic94xx.ko amd8111e.ko ata_generic.ko atl2.ko atp870u.ko b44.ko broadcom.ko caif.ko catc.ko ch.ko cn.ko crc-ccitt.ko crc-itu-t.ko cxgb.ko cxgb3.ko cxgb4.ko dl2k.ko dm-log.ko dm-mirror.ko dm-region-hash.ko dummy.ko forcedeth.ko gf128mul.ko isci.ko iscsi_boot_sysfs.ko isp116x-hcd.ko isp1362-hcd.ko isp1760.ko kaweth.ko macvlan.ko mlx4_core.ko mlx4_en.ko mpt2sas.ko mvsas.ko mvumi.ko nvme.ko pata_ali.ko pata_amd.ko pata_artop.ko pata_atp867x.ko pata_cmd64x.ko pata_hpt366.ko pata_hpt37x.ko pata_hpt3x2n.ko pata_hpt3x3.ko pata_it8213.ko pata_it821x.ko pata_jmicron.ko pata_marvell.ko pata_netcell.ko pata_ninja32.ko pata_oldpiix.ko pata_pdc2027x.ko pata_pdc202xx_old.ko pata_rdc.ko pata_sch.ko pata_serverworks.ko pata_sis.ko pata_via.ko pdc_adma.ko pegasus.ko pm80xx.ko qla1280.ko r8152.ko rng-core.ko rtl8150.ko sata_highbank.ko sata_inic162x.ko sata_nv.ko sata_promise.ko sata_qstor.ko sata_sil.ko sata_sis.ko sata_svw.ko sata_sx4.ko sata_uli.ko sata_via.ko sata_vsc.ko sc92031.ko scsi_transport_srp.ko sis190.ko ssb.ko stex.ko sundance.ko sym53c8xx.ko udf.ko via-velocity.ko zlib_deflate.ko zlib.ko Hide ############## Tutorial UPDATES ################## Change log - Click HERE [30/10/2016] Jun loader updated to version v1.0. This loader now supports AMD [03/11/2016] Jun's loader updated to version v1.01 [18/11/2016] Overhaul of the tutorial to reflect new features and fixes in the loader [19/11/2016] Minor edits and clarifications [20/11/2016] Minor edits + added link on how to burn & mount image in MAC OS. 3rd Paragraph [05/12/2016] Added note about SATA0. Modified/improved warning + detailed note 5 (Force Install) [09/12/2016] Title changed from "Tutorial: Migrate from DSM 5.2 to 6.0 - Baremetal" to "Tutorial: Install/Migrate DSM 5.2 to 6.0 (Jun's loader)" [19/01/2017] Point 10. Added following comment: "Update 9 seems to be causing some issues, so stay on update 8 until further notice" [20/01/2017] Minor edits [30/01/2017] Note 5 clarified [22/02/2017] Edit Warning message due to inaccuracy: DSM 6.0.2 Beta branch 7274 to DSM 6.0 Beta 2 branch 7274 [23/02/2017] Point 10. Added following comment: DO NOT UPDATE DSM TO VERSION 6.1. [27/02/2017] Trantor added a mirror to loader [02/03/2017] Link to Loader updated [08/03/2017] Added following comment to Warning message: DO NOT UPDATE DSM TO VERSION 6.1 with loader v1.01 + Minor edits [24/04/2017] Point 10. You can update to Update 11 [28/04/2017] Do not update to DSM 6.1.1 [09/05/2017] Do not update to DSM 6.0.3 [12/05/2017] Added link to serial generator & clarification about MAC address [19/05/2017] Added custom extra.lzma ramdisk link + how to replace ramdisk in loader + ramdisk change log + additional minor edits [28/05/2017] Updated custom ramdisk -- broadcom.ko module was not loading due to module not being mentioned in to rc.modules [18/06/2017] Updated tutorial links to new forum platform [21/06/2017] Do not update to DSM 6.1.2 + Title changed from "Tutorial: Install/Migrate DSM 5.2 to 6.0 (Jun's loader)" to "Tutorial: Install/Migrate DSM 5.2 to 6.0.2 (Jun's loader)" [21/08/2017] Modified warning message: DO NOT UPDATE DSM BEYOND VERSION 6.0.2 (6.0.3, 6.1, 6.1.1, 6.1.2, 6.1.3 etc) with loader v1.01. + minor edits [03/09/2017] Temporarily removed custom ramdisk [10/09/2017] Removed 'amd-rng.ko', 'via-rng.ko' and 'pata_atiixp.ko' modules from custom extra.lzma ramdisk. All modules were failing and 'pata_atiixp.ko' was cause a kernel panic. [15/09/2017] "[...] Please provide your hardware specifications (motherboard model, LAN controller, driver controller etc). Failure to prove such information will lead to the post being deleted. Click the 'Like this' button if you liked the tutorial." Hide