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Hi :)

 

For those of you using DDNS to remotely access your xpen rig, what DDNS provider did you chose?

AFAIU, Synology as a DDNS provider is out of the game for non-synology hardware, right?

 

Why did you chose this specific DDNS provider (the list available in DSM6 is quite large)?

 

Some of these DDNS providers will no longer be available in DSM7 AFAIU. Which on would you recommend then?

 

DOoany of them support IPv6? My NAS can be reached through its IPv6 but it has no routable IPv4.

I'm cannot remember the name of the technology that my fiber ISP is using but basically the IPv4 my router gets is only a local one and tools like "find my IP" report the IP of a different router that is managed by my ISP and that serves probably most of the home routers in the neighborhood (treats them as some kind of virtual LAN or something).

 

Thank you very much in advance for your feedback.

Best,

-a-

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5 hours ago, asheenlevrai said:

Thanks. I need more than 3 hostnames (ideally 8).

 

I wonder if a free service allows for that many or if I need to combine multiple free services

 

It's a bit strange what you are asking for.  All the host names must reference the same IP.  So what is the point to have more than one?

 

But if you really do need them, there is a better way if you own an public domain.  What you are really getting from a DDNS provider is a single domain or subdomain.  You can map that into your owned domain DNS to create as many hosts as you like referencing it.  Here is how:

 

Step #1: set up your DDNS to link with your domain DNS.  I use a docker "80x86/ddns-updater:amd64" instead of the internal DSM functionality because that docker directly supports updates to my domain's cloudflare DNS, which saves me an integration step.

 

image.thumb.png.956039b94aab6faa84dd84ff486ca170.png

 

Step #2: create CNAMES for all the hosts you want to access, referencing the DDNS hostname.  In this example, "local.foo.net" now duplicates the DDNS host. You can create as many as you like.

 

Type Name Content
A ddns 1.2.3.4
A foo.net 65.65.65.65
CNAME local ddns.foo.net
CNAME mail mail.publicmail.com
CNAME webmail mail.publicmail.com
CNAME whoami foo.net
CNAME www foo.net
CNAME other foo.net

 

Of course, as mentioned previously, all these hosts will still map to the same IP.  If you are trying to access multiple hosts within your network, you'll need to use some additional method to steer the requests to the correct internal hosts with your firewall.

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6 hours ago, flyride said:

 

It's a bit strange what you are asking for.  All the host names must reference the same IP.  So what is the point to have more than one?

 

But if you really do need them, there is a better way if you own an public domain.  What you are really getting from a DDNS provider is a single domain or subdomain.  You can map that into your owned domain DNS to create as many hosts as you like referencing it.  Here is how:

 

Step #1: set up your DDNS to link with your domain DNS.  I use a docker "80x86/ddns-updater:amd64" instead of the internal DSM functionality because that docker directly supports updates to my domain's cloudflare DNS, which saves me an integration step.

 

image.thumb.png.956039b94aab6faa84dd84ff486ca170.png

 

Step #2: create CNAMES for all the hosts you want to access, referencing the DDNS hostname.  In this example, "local.foo.net" now duplicates the DDNS host. You can create as many as you like.

 

Type Name Content
A ddns 1.2.3.4
A foo.net 65.65.65.65
CNAME local ddns.foo.net
CNAME mail mail.publicmail.com
CNAME webmail mail.publicmail.com
CNAME whoami foo.net
CNAME www foo.net
CNAME other foo.net

 

Of course, as mentioned previously, all these hosts will still map to the same IP.  If you are trying to access multiple hosts within your network, you'll need to use some additional method to steer the requests to the correct internal hosts with your firewall.

Thank you very much for the detailed answer :) I appreciate it 👍

 

It seems like I am quite confused and don't really understand what i was asking I guess.

What I need is a simple url to access a NAS remotely. Like myNASname.noip.com, or something like that, which would redirect to the IPv6 of my NAS.

And I need to do that for 6-8 different NASes.

I am not able (yet) to understand most of what you explained (Excuse my ignorance, I'll do my homework) but it sounds like it is out of the scope of what I am trying to achieve, right?

 

Tx again

-a-

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57 minutes ago, asheenlevrai said:

What I need is a simple url to access a NAS remotely. Like myNASname.noip.com, or something like that, which would redirect to the IPv6 of my NAS.

And I need to do that for 6-8 different NASes.

I am not able (yet) to understand most of what you explained (Excuse my ignorance, I'll do my homework) but it sounds like it is out of the scope of what I am trying to achieve, right?

 

With IPv6, DDNS should not be strictly necessary.  You ought to be able to enable IPv6 routing on your firewall, open ports for all the hosts/services that need to be remotely reachable, and then just enter the IPv6 address.  You could "name" them with a local host table or any other method.  I didn't even know that IPv6 DDNS was available (it is, by some vendors) but it really makes little sense since IPv6 addresses are completely unique.

 

With IPv4, there are usually no routable addresses behind a dynamic IP assignment from the ISP.  Therefore we need to find that dynamic IP to even get to the network that your host is on.  Then a firewall rule needs to be employed to translate the outside dynamic IP to an inside IP.  This can only be done for one IP on a specific port (which makes multiple hosts very difficult to achieve without some very fancy firewall programming or dedicated port assignments).

 

TL;DR: If your network, hosts and ISP are fully  IPv6 enabled, you really don't need DDNS.  If you have to use IPv4, DDNS can easily support access to one host in your network.  It is quite complicated to use IPv4 DDNS to support multiple hosts offering the same services.

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6 hours ago, flyride said:

 

With IPv6, DDNS should not be strictly necessary.  You ought to be able to enable IPv6 routing on your firewall, open ports for all the hosts/services that need to be remotely reachable, and then just enter the IPv6 address.  You could "name" them with a local host table or any other method. 

You are right, I can already access them using the IPv6.

However this is highly inconvenient because of how painful it is to try to memorize those.

I thought I needed DDNS to "translate" an IPv6 into something more convenient, like easyname.noip.com, my mistake.

Could you please point to instructions on how to "name" my IPv6 addresses? I don't know what a local host table is (I'll google that ASAP).

 

Thank you so much :)

Best,

-a-

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DNS (domain name service) is used to translate an IP address to a name.  DDNS (dynamic DNS) is used to map a temporary name to a temporary address, specifically to solve the problem of short IPv4 leases and therefore changing target IPs.

 

If you don't have access to a DNS resource (i.e. manage a publicly available, suitable domain/website), you will need to use a local hosts file, or I guess this is potentially a reason for DDNS IPv6.

 

Wikipedia

*nix/Macintosh

Windows and more Windows

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1 hour ago, flyride said:

DNS (domain name service) is used to translate an IP address to a name.  DDNS (dynamic DNS) is used to map a temporary name to a temporary address, specifically to solve the problem of short IPv4 leases and therefore changing target IPs.

 

If you don't have access to a DNS resource (i.e. manage a publicly available, suitable domain/website), you will need to use a local hosts file, or I guess this is potentially a reason for DDNS IPv6.

 

Wikipedia

*nix/Macintosh

Windows and more Windows

IIUC the host file is a local file that would translate an url (domain name, is it the same thing?) into an IP address, right?

It means, I would need to have such a host file on all the client computers/NASes in order for myeasytoremembername.something.com to actually mean anything.

I couldn't use myeasytoremembername.something.com from a random computer to access my NAS remotely since this client would lack the host file, right?

 

So IIUC, I'm back to square one : find a DDNS provider that could allow me to "link" an easy url to the IPv6 address of my NAS, right?

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Posted (edited)
On 7/1/2021 at 12:19 AM, asheenlevrai said:

Hi :)

 

For those of you using DDNS to remotely access your xpen rig, what DDNS provider did you chose?

AFAIU, Synology as a DDNS provider is out of the game for non-synology hardware, right?

 

Why did you chose this specific DDNS provider (the list available in DSM6 is quite large)?

 

Some of these DDNS providers will no longer be available in DSM7 AFAIU. Which on would you recommend then?

I use TailScale to access my boxes. There's a spk package for DSM and an Android app. Tailscale is actually WireGuard for dummies.

 

Every device running TailScale gets an address like 100.106.6.111 (XPE_Home) or 100.105.6.162 (XPE_Work).

 

100.106.6.111:3000 opens Adguard on my home server while 100.105.6.162:5000 opens DSM on my work server. 

 

That way I can also use Synology apps on my Android phone and access DScam or DSdownload when I'm away from home.

 

Edited by Noter2017
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