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Critical system errors occurred. Please contact us immediately for technical support


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I am getting this error. Critical system errors occurred. Please contact us immediately for technical support 

In synology there is a repair link at the end of this.  I cannot get rid of this message. The last time I got rid of this was to reinstall xpenology and I don't want to do that again. I do believe this happens because of the unplugging of the power cable.

 

Running 

DSM 6.2.3-25426 Update 2

 

https://postimg.cc/gallery/LYSf0Sz

 

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Well, you can't repair a system partition when you only have one drive.  There is no disk redundancy in your system.  If there were, DSM would allow you to do the repair from the Control Panel.

 

For reference, /dev/md0 is DSM/Linux.  /dev/md1 is Linux swap and /dev/md2 is your volume. "E" is a custom mdadm disk status flag that is part of Synology's data integrity enhancements to Linux.

 

While it appears that the filesystem on /dev/md0 is operational (I assume you can still boot DSM), the one array member is flagged as bad. I agree the cause may have been the power outage and uncommitted write state, so DSM flagged it to error. There are two ways to fix this problem:

  1. recreate the array with mdadm.  Here's a reference:
    https://www.dsebastien.net/2015/05/19/recovering-a-raid-array-in-e-state-on-a-synology-nas/
    However, this requires that you are able to stop the array to recreate it, and that is your booted OS.  So you will need to take the drive and install it on another Linux system to do it.  The array you need to rebuild is /dev/md0 and you will have to figure out the disk array member (it will probably be /dev/sdb1 if you install the DSM disk to a single-disk Linux system). As long as you don't make a mistake, this has no impact to the data inside the array.
  2. reinstall DSM. You should be able to do this from Synology Assistant without building up a new loader USB. Just download and install the same PAT file you are running now. This will reset any OS customizations (save off your configuration in Control Panel first, then restore afterward), but your user data should be unaffected.

In the future, you should consider adding another drive for redundancy so that you don't encounter this again. It really should be a non-issue.

Edited by flyride
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This is what I got.

 


Personalities : [linear] [raid0] [raid1] [raid10] [raid6] [raid5] [raid4] [raidF1]
md2 : active raid1 sda3[0]
      971940544 blocks super 1.2 [1/1]

md1 : active raid1 sda2[0]
      2097088 blocks [12/1] [U___________]

md0 : active raid1 sda1[0](E)
      2490176 blocks [12/1] [E___________]
 

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24 minutes ago, flyride said:

Well, you can't repair a system partition when you only have one drive.  There is no disk redundancy in your system.  If there were, DSM would allow you to do the repair from the Control Panel.

 

For reference, /dev/md0 is DSM/Linux.  /dev/md1 is Linux swap and /dev/md2 is your volume. "E" is a custom mdadm disk status flag that is part of Synology's data integrity enhancements to Linux.

 

While it appears that the filesystem on /dev/md0 is operational (I assume you can still boot DSM), the one array member is flagged as bad. I agree the cause may have been the power outage and uncommitted write state, so DSM flagged it to error. There are two ways to fix this problem:

  1. recreate the array with mdadm.  Here's a reference:
    https://www.dsebastien.net/2015/05/19/recovering-a-raid-array-in-e-state-on-a-synology-nas/
    However, this requires that you are able to stop the array to recreate it, and that is your booted OS.  So you will need to take the drive and install it on another Linux system to do it.  The array you need to rebuild is /dev/md0 and you will have to figure out the disk array member (it will probably be /dev/sdb1 if you install the DSM disk to a single-disk Linux system). As long as you don't make a mistake, this has no impact to the data inside the array.
  2. reinstall DSM. You should be able to do this from Synology Assistant without building up a new loader USB. Just download and install the same PAT file you are running now. This will reset any OS customizations (save off your configuration in Control Panel first, then restore afterward), but your user data should be unaffected.

In the future, you should consider adding another drive for redundancy so that you don't encounter this again. It really should be a non-issue.

Thanks. Makes sense. 

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