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epicurean

hardware good enough?

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I wish to exist an existing gigabyte G41M combo board with 8GB ram and a Core 2 Duo e6600 CPU, to build an ESXi server with 2 VMs only (windows 7, and xpenology).

I have an ASM1061 which I intend to use the 2 SATA ports to for a datastore, whilst using the onbard 4 sata ports for a RAID 5 file server( xpenology).

 

Will the hardware I have be able to run both VMs (both of which need to be running simultaneously) sufficiently?

 

Any suggestions welcomed.

 

thank you.

 

PS - I have tried just DSM 5.0 xpenology on bare metal on this hardware and it works fine.

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I'm pretty sure (though i'm just a newbie as well).

 

Synology needs 1-2GB Ram, Windows likes 4GB (or more).

I've a simlar setup (Celeron 2x 2,7GHz), Synology takes between 200MHz (of 5400MHz = 2*2,7GHz) IDLE and ~2000MHz (file transaction).

Using Windows 7 while copying files has no noticeable impact on Win7 perfomance (I must admit, I do not work with the Win7 VM, it's just about running some prgrammms all the time).

 

best reards,

Christian

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Thanks so much for replying Christian.

Would you be able to advise me which part of my hardware should passthrough for the xpenology NAS, and which I should use for the windows 7? I am using Windows 7 mainly for a Mysql server based software, whilst the NAS will server mostly as storage and as a file server.

I have no experience at all with Esxi, is it very technical and difficult to implement? I don't understand what people saying about RDM and the other form

 

Much thanks

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If you want to start slowly with VM maybe Workstation or VMWare Player. I run VM Workstation under Win 7. I have multiple VM machines (not all powered on at once) and DSM. DSM has 640MB allocated and 2 CPU cores. main system is Shuttle XPC with i5-2500 CPU- 16GB and 5x128GB SSD. Each SSD serves a particular function. 3 are used for VM systems. I have an eSATA card and Sans Digital 4xSATA case, 3 drives are for DSM. Map the drives as physical. The DSM is purely to test updates and other assorted tests

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If mainly for MySQL, you should eliminate Win and use database server directly on DSM unless you're not actually using MySQL but MSSQL that's native on Win

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thank u again all for the replies. I am actually using a medical information system software that uses mysql as it's database. Although it does work in DSM, administering it in Win7 - which I have set it up as a peer to peer server for other workstations - is very much easier. I also wish to have DSM as a VM for its ability to backup the mysql database easily, and it's other neat packages. But as I am a complete noob with Esxi, want to try with this simple set up first.

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I suggest you download vmware player (as it's free) and install it under Win7.

You can then create a virtual machine to run DSM in.

You can create disks for your VM in two ways:

1) By allowing player to create a file in the Windows file system which it will use to simulate a real disk. (this is what you do for the nanoboot drive).

2) You can attach a real, physical disk directly to the VM bypassing Windows. This is what all the RDM stuff is about and how you handle the DSM volumes.

The second option is going to be faster for the VM and in vmware player is a simple menu option in the edit machine menus.

 

You can then keep your Win 7 installation as is and just concentrate on one new thing.

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Thank you billat29.

 

How is your method different from say...creating a esxi server from scratch ,and then putting the win 7 VM and the DSM VM in? ..or installing virtual box in my current bare metal DSM, and putting in a win 7 VM?

 

Which has better performance overall, and easier to maintain and backup?

 

much thanks...still learning so much from everyone!

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thank u again all for the replies. I am actually using a medical information system software that uses mysql as it's database. Although it does work in DSM, administering it in Win7 - which I have set it up as a peer to peer server for other workstations - is very much easier.

Is medical information system software native on Win or Website base? If Website base, it's easier to maintain on Linux since Linux box uses less system resources and face much less virus, spyware and hacking. Of course, "less" doesn't mean "never"

I also wish to have DSM as a VM for its ability to backup the mysql database easily, and it's other neat packages. But as I am a complete noob with Esxi, want to try with this simple set up first.

Are you already had backup script(s) in place? If using MyISAM, it's simply copy and paste database folder(s), so a simple script to copy same database folder to folder1, then folder2 and on next backup will be folder3 and delete folder1, rename 2 to 1 and 3 to 2, so always has 2 latest backups for 1 database. If using InnoDB, you might have to run MySQL_Dump in your script but the concept should be the same. Before MySQL version 5.5, MyISAM is the default storage engine when you create a table without explicitly specify the storage engine. From version 5.5, MySQL uses InnoDB as the default storage engine.

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Thank you billat29.

 

How is your method different from say...creating a esxi server from scratch ,and then putting the win 7 VM and the DSM VM in? ..or installing virtual box in my current bare metal DSM, and putting in a win 7 VM?

 

Which has better performance overall, and easier to maintain and backup?

 

much thanks...still learning so much from everyone!

Using VMware player is very similar to using ESXi. The major difference here is that you can continue with the Win7 machine as is, add player as Windows application and run DSM under that. There is less risk involved as you will not be changing the WIndows 7 setup.

Player is a little easier to setup and use, but is less flexible than ESXi. Obviously you will be dependent on the Windows host running.

If, at a later stage, you wish to virtualise the Win7 machine, then it is straightforward to move the DSM machine from running under player to running under ESXi.

Performance will depend on the hardware you are running on. There is an overhead to virtualisation and I think I have seen some people say that the DSM file transfer speed is a bit lower under ESXi but not that much. The big difference for me is that under ESXi, DSM doesn't have access to the SMART data from the disks. ESXi also doesn't allow DSM to spin the disks down when idle. I know that you have a 24/7 requirement and that there are different opinions on whether unloading the disks is desirable or not.

 

If starting from scratch, I would be tempted to install DSM on bare metal, migrate the database to DSM if at all possible and create a Win7 VM under virtualbox. (note, I have tried virtualbox under DSM, itself in a VM, but haven't done that much with it myself).

 

Backup? Unless anyone has better thoughts, I think that as you will be attaching real disks to the VM, then there isn't that much difference in your backup strategy but I'm willing to be corrected.

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Is medical information system software native on Win or Website base? If Website base, it's easier to maintain on Linux since Linux box uses less system resources and face much less virus, spyware and hacking. Of course, "less" doesn't mean "never"

I also wish to have DSM as a VM for its ability to backup the mysql database easily, and it's other neat packages. But as I am a complete noob with Esxi, want to try with this simple set up first.

Are you already had backup script(s) in place? If using MyISAM, it's simply copy and paste database folder(s), so a simple script to copy same database folder to folder1, then folder2 and on next backup will be folder3 and delete folder1, rename 2 to 1 and 3 to 2, so always has 2 latest backups for 1 database. If using InnoDB, you might have to run MySQL_Dump in your script but the concept should be the same. Before MySQL version 5.5, MyISAM is the default storage engine when you create a table without explicitly specify the storage engine. From version 5.5, MySQL uses InnoDB as the default storage engine.

 

HI, Yes the software is native on Windows, not a website base. I wish it could be used on linux but its a purely windows based software as most medical information systems are. Strangely there are no backup scripts in windows for this software, but I do have one to backup mysql database in DSM every 2 hours, so that is really useful. The software (Open Dental) is open source and has very regular updates , with an easy to use interface so I am still inclined to use a virtualised WIndows 7 PC setup as a peer to peer server(only for its mysql database). The photos, scanned images can all be on the DSM and shared as a file server.

 

I also thought by virtualising, I can always trial a win 8.1 setup in the future for the same function, without needing to have it "live".

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much thanks...still learning so much from everyone!

Using VMware player is very similar to using ESXi. The major difference here is that you can continue with the Win7 machine as is, add player as Windows application and run DSM under that. There is less risk involved as you will not be changing the WIndows 7 setup.

Player is a little easier to setup and use, but is less flexible than ESXi. Obviously you will be dependent on the Windows host running.

If, at a later stage, you wish to virtualise the Win7 machine, then it is straightforward to move the DSM machine from running under player to running under ESXi.

Performance will depend on the hardware you are running on. There is an overhead to virtualisation and I think I have seen some people say that the DSM file transfer speed is a bit lower under ESXi but not that much. The big difference for me is that under ESXi, DSM doesn't have access to the SMART data from the disks. ESXi also doesn't allow DSM to spin the disks down when idle. I know that you have a 24/7 requirement and that there are different opinions on whether unloading the disks is desirable or not.

 

If starting from scratch, I would be tempted to install DSM on bare metal, migrate the database to DSM if at all possible and create a Win7 VM under virtualbox. (note, I have tried virtualbox under DSM, itself in a VM, but haven't done that much with it myself).

 

Backup? Unless anyone has better thoughts, I think that as you will be attaching real disks to the VM, then there isn't that much difference in your backup strategy but I'm willing to be corrected.

 

Thanks for such an informative reply again.

Supposing I want to reduce the number of pc, and do not mind starting from scratch, what would be the "ideal" setup for best performance?

 

1) DSM on bare metal, create win7 VM under virtualbox

2) install Esxi, Win 7 VM, DSM VM

3) any other suggestions?

 

much thanks to everyone again.

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